Monday, October 19, 2009

Fall 2009 EDC Resource Review

In this issue:

Journal Reviews:

1. Dee, K. C. (2007). Student perceptions of high course workloads are not associated with poor student evaluations of instructor performance. Journal of Engineering Education, 96(1), 69-78.

Submitted by: Nicola Simmons, Centre for Teaching Excellence (CTE), University of Waterloo

In this study of engineering students’ course evaluations at two institutions, Dee found no correlation between student perceptions of high course workload and low overall instructor performance ratings. This is contrary to what Dee reports as a common belief (one held by 54% of faculty) that “to get favourable evaluations, professors demand less from students” (p. 69). On the other hand, many items were strongly correlated with overall instructor performance ratings, including “the professor used teaching methods that helped me learn”, “the professor met the course objectives”, and “the professor was generally well-prepared for class”.

Recommendation: The article is heavy on statistics, but the results are interesting and compelling - and could provide an excellent starting point for conversations with faculty, particularly those in engineering, math, and science disciplines.

Keywords: course evaluations, student workload, engineering

2. Gale, R., & Golde, C. M. (2004). Doctoral education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) PeerReview, Spring, pp. 8-12.

Submitted by Nicola Simmons, Centre for Teaching Excellence (CTE), University of Waterloo

Gale and Golde present clear argument for introducing doctoral students not only to teaching, but also to the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), and offer several tips as well as suggested resources on how this can be accomplished. The article’s perspective is American, with strong ties to the Carnegie Foundation’s work, but the resources are accessible to all, and the issues addressed are pervasive.

Recommendations: A very clear read for those beginning to think about SoTL, particularly when considering programs for graduate students. Some nice quotable sections for substantiating the need for such programs.

Keywords: doctoral student preparation, SoTL

Website Review:
1. ProfHacker Blog
http://www.profhacker.com/

Submitted by: Linda B. Nilson, Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation, Clemson University, USA

This blog addresses much more than technology and software, which is why it gets 10,000 page views a week. It posts academically-relevant information and advice on how technology can enhance faculty productivity, time management, mentoring, collaboration, research, and many aspects of teaching, including course planning and management, learning goals, syllabus design, mindful learning, group work, grade records, and assessment. In addition, it features ways to make the most of Internet tools such as blogs, wikis, Twitter, Google, Zotero (for group work), and Doodle as well as free software such as WordPress and CommentPress. Two tech-savvy American professors, Jason B. Jones from Central Connecticut State University and George H. Williams from the University of South Carolina Upstate, run the site, and they have ten regular contributors. Jones and Williams claim that they learn the best practices they promote from solving their own problems on the job. Ultimately, they aim to make the faculty member's life easier. Wednesday's "Open Thread" offers readers the chance to ask for help, advice, and feedback and to share advice, feedback, and ideas about topics that ProHacker should cover in the future.

Educational developers can use this blog to help them stay on top of the latest technology relevant to the faculty, and they can refer faculty to it for the same purpose. They or their faculty may also want to post questions, responses, or examples of their applications to the Open Thread. In addition, faculty who have developed their own software or have used software in unusual ways can share their innovations with colleagues on this blog.

Keywords: technology, productivity, pedagogy, research, Internet

Thursday, August 6, 2009

Summer 2009 EDC Resource Review

In this issue:
Website Reviews:

Brock University Learning Technology Development Learning Object Showcase
http://www.brocku.ca/learningobjects/flash_content/

Submitted by: Linda B. Nilson, Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation, Clemson University, USA

A learning object is a digital resource that offers reusable instructional lessons, the best of which feature animation and interactivity. Instructors can use them for in-class demonstrations, make them in-class activities if students have access to computers, or assign them as homework. Merlot.org contains thousands of them, but only a subset is animated and interactive. All of those in Brock University's select collection, however, have these superior traits, and they are among the best available on the Web. Designed by instructional technologists under faculty guidance, the twenty learning objects on the site offer animated tutorials, tools, exercises, games, and simulations in basic concepts and principles in communication studies, English, earth science, environmental science, finance, German language, mathematics, psychology, time management, and writing.

Educational developers will find that faculty who are not already familiar with learning objects--and most are not--will be excited to get acquainted with such student-friendly and free resources. Visual and kinesthetic learners, often those that faculty have trouble reaching, should especially value these digital lessons for their affective appeal and instructional effectiveness.

Keywords: learning object, animation, interactivity, instructional technology
_________________________________________________________________
CUES: Connecting Undergraduates to the Enterprise of Science, University of Missouri
cues.missouri.edu

Submitted by Linda B. Nilson, Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation, Clemson University, USA

The science departments at the University of Missouri have integrated inquiry-based learning into their curricula. The laboratory exercises they assign to students are mini-journal articles that follow the format of a scientific journal article. The faculty have replaced the traditional "cookbook" laboratories with an inquiry-based format that encourages scientific practice. These laboratories build in the activities that scientists actually engage in while conducting research: reviewing the relevant literature, generating new hypotheses, designing and conducting appropriate experiments, collecting and analyzing data, and writing up the results in a journal article format. This Web site supplies instructors with detailed guidelines for constructing their own inquiry-based labs for undergraduate science courses and offers field-tested labs and assessments for biology, chemistry, geology, and physics. This project is an extension of the UM's proof-of-concept project (NSF 0230779, Converting Cookbook Laboratories into Inquiry). It encourages transforming more cookbook laboratories into the CUES mini-journal format, provides educational development to current and future science faculty, and fosters research on the effectiveness the CUES approach. Its objective is to enhance students' learning of science by improving the introductory science experience.

Educational developers can use this site to encourage and help their science faculty to revamp their cookbook laboratories into dynamic, inquiry-based activities. Faculty who are reluctant to transform their labs due to lack of time will find this site most help, as it will save them the effort of reinventing the wheel.

Keywords: science education, inquiry-based, inquiry-guided, laboratories

Monday, June 1, 2009

Spring 2009 EDC Resource Review

In this issue:

Website Review:
World Digital Library
http://www.wdl.org/en/

Journal Article Review:
Austin Z. Development and validation of the Pharmacists’ Inventory of Learning Styles (PILS). American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 2004:68(2):Article 37.
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Website Review:
World Digital Library
http://www.wdl.org/en/

Submitted by: Linda B. Nilson, Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation, Clemson University, USA

The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization designed this Web site especially for the culturally- and historically-minded scholar and student. As of its inauguration in spring 2009, it features almost 1200 scanned cultural artifacts from all over the world dating back to 8000 BCE: paintings (including rock paintings), sketches, photographs, portraits, maps, manuscripts, books, and documents, all annotated in seven languages (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, Spanish, and Portuguese). The primary materials assembled thus far come from 27 libraries in 19 countries (all UNESCO member nations), and all countries are invited to contribute, so the collection will no doubt grow. Browsers will appreciate the search engine's ability to locate artifacts by any combination of global region, time period, type of item, topic, and location of the original. Hosted by the U.S. Library of Congress, this site aims to enhance the digital cultural content, increase global understanding, narrow the digital divide worldwide, and serve broad educational and research purposes.

Educational developers can showcase this Web site to faculty who teach anthropology or any epoch of history as a valuable digital resource for in-class presentations and student (or faculty) research. In addition, the site can supply worthwhile cultural lessons and readings in intermediate and advanced language courses (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, Spanish, and Portuguese). Finally, developers can refer to this site as a source of visual materials for teaching the historical aspects of a wide range of subjects.

Keywords: world culture, world history, world civilization, cultural artifacts, languages

Journal Article Review:
Austin Z. Development and validation of the Pharmacists’ Inventory of Learning Styles (PILS). American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 2004:68(2):Article 37.

Submitted by: Zubin Austin, Associate Professor, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto

The Pharmacists’ Inventory of Learning Styles (PILS) is a validated instrument designed to assist educators in applying learning styles theory to education of health professional students. The Inventory provides an opportunity for self-reflection and self-assessment of preferences utilizing the learning styles theory. Instructors may use this instrument to promote dialogue regarding learning and learning environments amongst teachers, students, teaching assistants, and clinical preceptors. A key aspect of the PILS is the opportunity for individuals to share their own experiences as learners, reflecting upon strategies and approaches that may have been more or less successful/effective in a particular context. Since its publication, the PILS has been used extensively within pharmacy education across North America, and has been used in faculty development initiatives in other health professions across Canada.

Keywords: Learning styles, learning preferences

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

EDC January/ February 2008 Resource Review

Resource Reviews from the Educational Developers Caucus

January/February 2008

In this issue:
Website review:
Internet Resources for Higher Education Outcomes Assessment
www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/assmt/resource.htm


Book Review:
Delaney, J. Kirk. (2005). Taking Back the Classroom: Tips for the College Professor on Becoming a More Effective Teacher. Des Moines, Iowa and Seattle Washington: Tiberius Publications.


Journal Article:
Chandler, D. E., & Kram, K. E. (2005). Applying an adult development perspective to development networks. Career Development International 10(67), 548-566.


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Website review:
Internet Resources for Higher Education Outcomes Assessment
www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/assmt/resource.htm

Submitted by: Linda B. Nilson, Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation, Clemson University, U.S.A.

Housed and maintained by North Carolina State University, this site contains many hundreds of Web and Internet links to assessment-related resources as well as general assessment guidelines and principles. Access is available to general resources (discussion groups, journals and newsletters, archives of articles, consultants, rubrics, ethical standards, glossaries, and data-organizing tools); dozens of assessment handbooks/manuals; tools and tests for assessing specific skills and knowledge (e.g., for most academic disciplines as well as information literacy and critical thinking); institutional assessment strategies; and dozens of forms for and articles about student evaluations/ratings/assessment of courses and instructors.

If you are not already an assessment expert and you are called upon to become one quickly, this site is an excellent place to begin expanding your knowledge. It should prove especially valuable if faculty or administrators come to you seeking alternative ways to evaluate teaching effectiveness or to
measure student learning, whether of cognitive skills or of disciplinary knowledge and competencies.


Keywords: assessment, evaluation, tests, learning


Book Review:

Delaney, J. Kirk. (2005). Taking Back the Classroom: Tips for the College Professor on Becoming a More Effective Teacher. Des Moines, Iowa and Seattle Washington: Tiberius Publications.


Submitted by: Cathy Baillie, Program Assistant, Office of Teaching Advancement, University of Toronto


An overall worthy addition to your book shelf, this work acts as part reference tool, part guide for those who have questions about classroom management and syllabus design. Delaney’s book is easy to read but filled with thoughtful and helpful recommendations that are easy to apply; both the seasoned academic and new faculty members alike will learn some new tips for their classrooms. I especially like the question and answer format as well as the faculty and student suggestions.


For all of the reasons above and more. You will find yourself returning to this book to address your own questions as well as those from faculty.


Keywords: classroom management, difficult students, syllabus design


Journal Article:

Chandler, D. E., & Kram, K. E. (2005). Applying an adult development perspective to development networks. Career Development International 10(67), 548-566.


Submitted by: Nicola Simmons, Centre for Teaching Excellence, University of Waterloo.


The authors assert that mentoring is a “developmental network comprised of a number of relationships” (p. 548) rather than a traditional hierarchical structure. They apply Kegan’s (1982, 1994) developmental stage theory to the idea that an individual’s developmental stage affects the structure of his or her developmental network, along with how much support will be gained from it. Kegan’s latter three stages, interpersonal, institutional, and interindividual, are ones in which individuals can create and experience positive mentoring relationships.

The authors argue that developers offer the greatest support when they are at or above the faculty individual’s developmental stage.


An interesting article to support developers in considering the interpersonal relationship nature of the role.


Keywords: Developmental stages, faculty development, mentoring networks, Kegan’s adult development.

March/ April 2008 EDC Resource Review

Resource Reviews from the Educational Developers Caucus

March/ April 2008


In this issue:

Book Reviews
:
Ross, C. , Dunphy, J and Associates (2007). Strategies for Teaching Assistant and International Teaching Assistant Development. Jossey-Bass. San Francisco.

Savory, P., Burnett, A. N., & Goodburn, A. (2007). Inquiry into the college classroom : a journey toward scholarly teaching. Bolton, Massachusetts: Anker Publishing Company, Inc.

Friesen, E., Kristjanson, C. (Ed) (2007). Teaching at the University of Manitoba. A Handbook. Winnipeg, MB: Art Bookbindery.

Journal Review:
Rindermann, H., Kohler, J., & Meisenberg, G. (2007). Quality of instruction improved by evaluation and consultation and instructors. International Journal for Academic Development. 12(2),73-85

Reflections:
From: Nicola Simmons, Centre for Teaching Excellence (CTE), University of Waterloo, My 2008 EDC Conference Highlights

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Book Review
Ross, C. , Dunphy, J and Associates (2007). Strategies for Teaching Assistant and International Teaching Assistant Development. Jossey-Bass. San Francisco.
Submitted by: Dave Berry, Learning & Teaching Centre, University of Victoria.

This book is an excellent collection of teaching strategies, mini lessons and workshops intended for use in professional developmental programs. There are six sections: getting started, advanced skills, professional development, culture, pedagogy and language. The format of each submission (by a host of practitioners) lists goals, preparation time, execution time, resources, introduction, procedure, variations and references. Even if you don’t like the idea exactly as described, you will undoubtedly have created your own new version by the time you get to the bottom of the page. This is a great source of ideas that will deserve a revisit on a regular basis
Keywords: Teaching Assistants

Book Review
Savory, P., Burnett, A. N., & Goodburn, A. (2007). Inquiry into the college classroom : a journey toward scholarly teaching. Bolton, Massachusetts: Anker Publishing Company, Inc.
Submitted by: Penny Heaslip BScN, MEd, Coordinator, Centre for Teaching and Learning, Thompson Rivers University.

Classroom inquiry is a challenging idea for faculty to grasp if they have not had the opportunity to take a scholarly, disciplined approach to their teaching. Savory, Burnett and Goodburn (2007) address this challenge in their book by taking a pragmatic approach to inquiry into classroom teaching. They compare classroom inquiry to the tradition model of disciplinary-based scholarly research articulating the commonality of both investigative approaches. The authors lead the reader through the sequential steps of conducting classroom inquiry. Of particular value are the checks lists, and exhibits that illustrate each step in the process. Savory et al (2007) bring the process to life with examples of faculty inquiry into the problematic areas of teaching and learning in their classrooms. Through these examples the issues related to classroom inquiry are addressed. For example lack of sufficient data, or the interpretation, articulation and dissemination of the findings in a meaningful way.
For the faculty developer who wishes to encourage the scholarship of teaching and learning Savory et al (2007) have created a useful, clearly articulated approach for faculty development . A faculty development program with peer support could be built on this on this coherently written text on scholarly teaching.
Keywords: Classroom Inquiry, faculty development

Book Review
Friesen, E., Kristjanson, C. (Ed) (2007). Teaching at the University of Manitoba. A Handbook. Winnipeg, MB: Art Bookbindery A full PDF version of the book is available at
http://umanitoba.ca/uts/ A print copy can be purchased at the University of Manitoba Bookstore (1-204-8321) at a cost of $24.95.
Submitted by: Eunice Friesen, Associate Director,University Teaching Services, University of Manitoba

This is a collection of articles on teaching and learning. They are concise and succinct, based on a sound theoretical framework. The information is practical with many real life examples. The book is an excellent resource for new and experienced teachers alike. It is organized intuitively, with as little terminology as possible, making it user friendly for the professor with minimal knowledge of the educational terminology.
This is an excellent resource for one’s own practice of ED as it contains a collection of basic information on teaching and learning in one resource. It is a great tool to refer to instructors and professors prior to a consultation or as a follow-up to a consultation or workshop. It is convenient, portable and easy to use.
Keywords: Teaching, Learning, Student, Evaluation, Classroom management, Reflection and Assessment

Journal Review
Rindermann, H., Kohler, J., & Meisenberg, G. (2007). Quality of instruction improved by evaluation and consultation and instructors. International Journal for Academic Development. 12(2),73-85.
Submitted by: Erika Kustra, Centre for Leadership in Learning, McMaster University

Is teaching quality improved by student evaluation of instruction? Previous studies have shown that receiving the evaluations alone did not improve teaching quality. In this European study, evaluations were given mid-way through a course. The instructors met for a one hour consultation with the school manager who did not have pedagogical training, but who was a qualified Psychological counselor. The counselor provided both positive and negative feedback from the evaluations, asked for the lecturer's self-assessment, interaction patterns and discussed concrete ways to improve. The main focus was to suggest changes to preparation and teaching itself, and to provide support. The results were compared to evaluations collected the next year in the same course, but with new students. A significant improvement was found in teaching quality. Teachers with the poorest ratings, showed the most improvement, although rank orders did not change. Student reports of teaching competence, in particular, improved.
All instructors took part in this institutional initiative, and they have also noticed changes in student behaviours, including less absences, less disruption and greater reported commitment to learning.
This confirms that best practice with student evaluations of courses should include a meeting, although it does not necessarily need to be someone trained in pedagogy. It also suggests that when an entire institution takes part, they would likely see a change in student behaviour and commitment to learning.
Keywords: Student Evaluations, Quality, Research, Student engagement

Reflections
From: Nicola Simmons, Centre for Teaching Excellence (CTE), University of Waterloo, My 2008
EDC Conference Highlights

Preconference by Alice Cassidy and Ruth Rodgers - what a great chance to spend 'time on task' with a research question, be able to get feedback from colleagues, connect with like-minded others, and leave with a workable plan - fantastic!
Dieter's "Oh the Places You Will Go" provided a great opportunity for tangible data analysis (on ED career stages) activity in a short workshop. Dieter did a fabulous job of presenting his work, and equally, inviting participants to interact with it.
Russ Day's roundtable: "What's in a Name? The STLHE (Scholarly Teaching has Little Effect?) Dilemma" was a very interesting open discussion about how our titles include/exclude others. While based on whether colleges feel welcome at STLHE events, the discussion was relevant to how we name our workshops, our centres, etc.
Poster Sessions - I loved the interactive poster framework - congratulations to University of Windsor people for showcasing this! Loved adding to Beverley's poster. The UBC poster data re: comparing signed up and attended at workshops made me think about what data we're collecting, and how we're using it. If you missed seeing Jill's wonderful photos and hearing her story about Namibia, you missed something great.
Gary's closing plenary "Patience versus Urgency in Educational Development" focused on how to decide what to do now, what to do later, and how we each choose to use our personal resources while accomplishing what matters. I loved the presentation of the opposing perspectives - really highlighted the tensions we face. I'm still thinking about how to be as patient as a tree (or as unmoving as a rock?)
Overall, a fantastic conference! Looking forward to the presentations being up at the conference.

EDC May/June 2008 Resource Review

Resource Reviews from the Educational Developers Caucus
May/June 2008


In this issue:
*Book Review:*
Svinicki, M. D. (2004).

Learning and motivation in the postsecondary classroom. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing.

*Website Review: *
Discovering Psychology
http://www.learner.org/discoveringpsychology/index.html

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Book Review
Svinicki, M. D. (2004). Learning and motivation in the postsecondary classroom. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing.

Nicola Simmons, Centre for Teaching Excellence, University of Waterloo

Svinicki's book is a lovely overview of cognition theory as it applies to student learning. Although many of the ideas seem simple (the best ideas always are!), the well-researched theories prevent it from being just a `how to' book. Svinicki includes sections that go into greater depth ("For those who want to go beyond the basics"), as well as a section at the end that gives the "theories in a nutshell". While rich with theory, the book is equally rich with strategies for theory implementation: a fine example of praxis in action. Svinicki even walks the talk on motivation, beginning with a chapter aimed at motivating the reader to learn about the theories. Specific highlights include her use of numerous examples and analogies (e.g., how learning about learning theory is like maximizing your car's fuel efficiency), and her suggestions for application of the theory to classroom practice. She elaborates on the difference between novices and experts in a discipline (experts have a more structured understanding of discipline concepts and more quickly see what's missing). She discusses retention and transfer of learning, recommending linking new knowledge to existing structures and using examples to facilitate recall. A variety of strategies are given for developing structures for the discipline, such as concepts maps, comparative organizers, and sequencing examples.

While for some this book may be a reminder of what is already known, it would be an excellent entry point for faculty members interested in exploring an overview of some of the theory behind student learning and motivation.

Keywords: /cognition and learning, motivation, developing expertise, scaffolding/


*Website Review*
Discovering Psychology
http://www.learner.org/discoveringpsychology/index.html

Reviewed by Linda B. Nilson, Clemson University "The Discovering Psychology" telecourse and educational video series premiered in 1990 as a visual resource for teaching introductory psychology. The 26 video programs review the history of the field, from early to contemporary researchers and research studies, showing classic experiments and modern studies. Of interest to educational developers are the topics related to learning and cognition: conditioning, retention and retrieval, motivation and emotion, testing and intelligence, constructivism, and visual perception. If we lack a strong background in the field of learning and cognition, the videos can teach us a lot very quickly. They can also make entertaining additions to workshops and online resource collections on how students learn.

Keywords:/ cognitive processes, cognitive psychology, intelligence, learning, memory, motivation, testing /

EDC Summer 2008 Resource Review

Resource Reviews from the Educational Developers Caucus

*Summer 2008*

*In this issue:*

*Book Reviews:*

Wilcox, S. (1997). /Learning from our past: The history of educational development in Canadian universities/. Occasional Papers in Higher Education, 8. Centre for Higher Education Research and Development, The University of Manitoba and The Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

*Website Review:*

Successful Strategies for Teams: Team Member Handbook http://www.clemson.edu/OTEI/documents/TeamworkHandbook.pdf or http://www.clemson.edu/OTEI/resources/index.html


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*Book Review
*Wilcox, S. (1997). /Learning from our past: The history of educational development in Canadian universities/. Occasional Papers in Higher Education, 8. Centre for Higher Education Research and Development, The University of Manitoba and The Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

Isabeau Iqbal, Educational Developer, Centre for Teaching & Academic Growth. University of British Columbia

Wilcox's work is an account of the evolution of educational development in Canada during the time period spanning the 1960-1990s. Beautifully written, Wilcox uses personal interviews with educational developers to recount the origins and expansion of educational work. This paper, however, is more than a historical account: the author describes issues (ie. Conceptions of educational development, legitimacy of the field, roles educational developers play) that shape and influence educational development work and have direct relevance today.

I highly recommend this paper to educational developers who wish to gain a greater appreciation of the people, events, and issues that have shaped the growth of our field.

Keywords: educational development; history; Canada

*Website Review*

Successful Strategies for Teams: Team Member Handbook http://www.clemson.edu/OTEI/documents/TeamworkHandbook.pdf

or click on the title link at
http://www.clemson.edu/OTEI/resources/index.html

Submitted by Linda B. Nilson, Ph.D., Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation, Clemson University

These days we commonly have students work in teams, but we do little or nothing to teach them HOW to cooperate smoothly with each other to complete a project. Targeted to undergraduate students, this new e-book teaches collaborative skills and provides tools that help teams work productively. It was written by Frances A. Kennedy, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Accountancy and Legal Studies, with Linda B.
Nilson, Ph.D., Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation, both at Clemson University in South Carolina, USA. Among the many team skills addressed are organizing information, generating solid contributions from team members, managing time and schedules, organizing member roles and responsibilities, planning for and running efficient meetings, solving problems with qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques, and using appropriate organizational and analysis tools.
Templates are furnished for these organizational and analytic tools, including gap analysis, the affinity diagram, project planning, the milestone chart, and the diagraph.

Educational developers can use this handbook in a least two ways: as a resource/reference for faculty to help their students work more effectively and professionally in teams and as a source of material for workshops on how to maximize student learning in team projects.

Keywords: teams, small groups, cooperative learning, collaborative learning, student projects

EDC Fall 2008 Resource Review

Resource Reviews from the Educational Developers Caucus
Fall 2008


In this issue:

Website Review:

Learning Styles, Hawai'i Pacific University
http://faq.hpu.edu/tlc/faq-pro/index_hpu.php?action=article&cat_id=002&id=80

STLHE Conference Reflection:
Learning From Students
http://www.tag.ubc.ca/resources/tapestry/08/learningFromStudentsTapestry53.pdf

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Website Review
Learning Styles, Hawai'i Pacific University
http://faq.hpu.edu/tlc/faq-pro/index_hpu.php?action=article&cat_id=002&id=80
Submitted by Linda B. Nilson, Ph.D., Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation,
Clemson University

This site was designed with two user groups in mind: instructors and students. It explains to students what a learning style (or learning strength) is and how knowing about theirs can help them learn more efficiently, especially if they integrate the results of at least three instruments. The site also advises instructors to encourage students to complete some learning-style instruments, as well as to identify their own teaching strengths and vary their teaching methods to appeal to the different kinds of learners. Access is available to a several free instruments on the Web, each based on a different learning style schema with a simple instrument that identifies a person's learning-style profile within minutes. Among those linked are Richard Felder's 44-item questionnaire, the 16-item VARK instrument, two longer questionnaires associated with modified versions of the VARK framework, a seven-style assessment instrument, and other sites with still more free instruments and pedagogical resources.

Educational developers will find this site helpful in researching and developing a learning-style workshops for faculty, one that brings in a variety of schema. This site is also a good general reference resource for faculty.

Keywords: learning styles, learning strengths


STLHE Conference Reflection

Learning From Students
http://www.tag.ubc.ca/resources/tapestry/08/learningFromStudentsTapestry53.pdf
Or http://www.tag.ubc.ca/resources/tapestry/
Under “about or by students”, click on Learning from Students
Alice Cassidy, Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth (TAG), University of British Columbia

EDC Winter 2009 Resource Review

Resource Reviews from the Educational Developers Caucus

Winter 2009


In this issue:

Website Review:
The Higher Education Academy, United Kingdom
http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ourwork/professional/snas


Journal Article Review:
Kamler, B. (2008). Rethinking doctoral publication practices: writing from and beyond the thesis. Studies in Higher Education, 33(3), 283-294


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Website Review

The Higher Education Academy, United Kingdom
http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ourwork/professional/snas


Submitted by: Linda B. Nilson, Ph.D., Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation,
Clemson University


Check out the teaching resources across the pond. The Higher Education Academy in the UK developed this site with the mission of helping "institutions, discipline groups and all staff to provide the best possible learning experience for their students." At the site, you can search by discipline or by topic to find links to journals, research articles, book chapters, tutorials, simulations, professional association Web sites, and other resources that can enhance an instructor's professional development and/or courses. Among the topics you can search by are field work, group work, learning support, learning theory, problem-based learning, problem solving, student feedback, and evaluation. The thousands of resources accessible from this site are primarily British.

Value to Instructors and Educational Developers: Instructors who are accustomed to finding teaching and learning resources online will enjoy "shopping" for them in a probably unexplored sector of the Web. They can also send their students to some of these resources to learn, reinforce, or review classroom or online-course lessons.


Educational developers will see this site as a fruitful place to refer instructors or to search with them for fresh teaching material and aids.


Journal Article Review:
Kamler, B. (2008). Rethinking doctoral publication practices: writing from and beyond the thesis. Studies in Higher Education, 33(3), 283-294


Submitted by: Isabeau Iqbal, Educational Developer, UBC Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth, Doctoral Student, UBC Department of Educational Studies


This article highlights the need to give more pedagogical importance to writing for publication during doctoral education. Kamler argues that co-authorship with supervisors is a significant pedagogical practice that contributes to identity formation among graduate students and affects how they perceive their place in the academic community. The author presents data from a case study of graduates in science and education and demonstrates how different pedagogical and disciplinary practices in each community impacts on student publication and the way in which graduate student perceive the overall value of their work.


This article is of relevance to educational developers who support faculty members in the area of graduate supervision in that it provides evidence of the benefits of co-authorship as a pedagogical practice. "Senior" educational developers, keen to mentor graduate students at their centres into the educational development profession, may also wish to consider how they can make use of the practice.


keywords: doctoral studies, academic writing, co-publishing, supervision